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Artículo 'Game of Thrones' fans gear up for 'Jonerys' love scene in season finale Books

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'Game of Thrones' fans gear up for 'Jonerys' love scene in season finale

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Playground Traduccion

28 Agosto 2017 07:07

'It’s all about Dany and Jon Snow', GRRM once noted

By: Alberto del Castillo

When you hear people saying: ‘I respect fantasy, but I can’t put up with incoherences or a lack of authenticity’, then you know that history really does repeat itself. Series junkies began saying it for the third season of Lost and here it is being cried again about the seventh season of Game of Thrones.

When it comes to the latter, there is a tacit agreement subscribed to by creators and consumers alike: there are dragons, there are prophecies, there are resurrections. But crows reaching speeds Elon Musk could only dream about or Daenerys being more upset about Jon Snow getting hurt than the death of one of her own dragons?

That’s where we draw the line, seems to be the message from the Game of Thrones fan community.

Life’s ironies. You wait for six years for Daenerys to reach Westeros, imagining what it’s going to be like to defeat the Lannisters with dragons, fantasising about a meeting between Jon and Dany and when it finally happens…

‘It would be sickening and offensive if the two most overrated characters of the series end up together. Let the Others have them, along with their repugnant, fan-fiction romance,’ reads a post on one forum.

So there you have it. The wet dream of those that don’t inhabit the fantasy world of George R.R. Martin...

Noel Ceballos, author of one of the most brilliant analyses of the last episode, wrote: ‘Kit Harington should be grateful to the showrunners for another episode that is, in essence, a piece of fanfiction starring Jon Nieve, the infallible hero’.

It is no surprise that the idyllic course that some of the events are taking in this season could be leaving some fans of the series feeling somewhat hoodwinked: the words ‘Disney’ and ‘Jonerys’ (Jon and Daenerys) are being increasingly bandied about. But Game of Thrones is not a series known for keeping its viewers happy.

And Martin has already warned us the end will be bittersweet.

It’s worth bearing in mind that Jonerys is, from a political point of view, the most viable option: if the White Walkers didn’t exist, it would come in quite handy for Daenerys to start up an alliance with the King in the North to dominate the coldest part of Westeros without harming a single Unsullied.

Jon and Daenerys seem to be destined to be together. Their stories are very alike: both exiled because of their origins, both fatherless because of the Lannisters and motherless due to complications at childbirth. They grew up among savages and their respective partners - also savages - have died.

Although one of the most unsettling elements in this storyline is the incestual nature of an aunty shacking up with her nephew, it is worth taking a look at the family tree of the Targaryens.

Cersei and Jaime are beginners compared with Aegon the Conqueror, who married his two sisters to preserve the purity of the lineage.

In any case, whatever happens - and considering the next episode is titled The Dragon and The Wolf, it probably will happen - Jonerys is a fact that cannot be solely attributed to the fan-fiction lobby. After all, in the words of George R. R. Martin (reiterated recently by Alan Taylor and allegedly pronounced during filming of the first season) it will soon be revealed how 'the relationship between Jon and Daenerys is the whole point'.

So, would this union be more easily tolerated if Winds of Winter had been published before this season, and in it readers could see the literary version of Jonerys?

It would certainly appear that way. It seems to be Martin’s seal of approval that fans thirst for, not that of Benioff and Weiss.

Whatever happens, those who have branded this union as sickening can always live in the hope that, in amongst all the twists and turns the books have taken, Snow’s resurrection may have been - cliché of clichés - just a dream...

bastardo

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