/news/The-Pentagon-has-admitted-it-ran-a-UFO-sighting-programme-for-5-years-but-its-findings-are-unknown_24538628.html The Pentagon has admitted it ran a UFO sighting programme for 5 years - but its findings are unknown | Playground Plus

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Artículo The Pentagon admitted it ran a UFO sighting programme for 5 years - but its findings are unknown News

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The Pentagon admitted it ran a UFO sighting programme for 5 years - but its findings are unknown

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The Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Programme could still be in existence now

Anna Freeman

18 Diciembre 2017 11:59

The Pentagon has admitted it ran a secret programme solely dedicated to investigating sightings of unidentified flying objects, or UFOs as they are commonly known as.

Although the Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Programme ended five years ago as US defence officials focused their attention and funding to other priorities, it remains unclear whether it continues to investigate sightings of mysterious vehicles.

The programme ran from 2007 to 2012 with $22m (£15m) in annual funding, which was hidden in US Defence Department budgets worth billions of dollars, according to The New York Times.

Initially, funding came largely at the request of former Senate Democratic leader Harry Reid, the Nevada Democrat known for his enthusiasm for space and science, the publication said.

‘I’m not embarrassed or ashamed or sorry I got this thing going,’ Reid told The New York Times.

But according to its backers and the newspaper, the programme remains in existence and officials continue to investigate UFO episodes brought to their attention by service members alongside their other duties.

However, The Pentagon disagreed as to the fate of the programme. ‘The Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Programme ended in the 2012 timeframe,’ Laura Ochoa, a spokeswoman said.

‘It was determined that there were other, higher priority issues that merited funding and it was in the best interest of the Department of Defence to make a change.’

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